Review: Realitone Realivox Blue Solo Female Vocal Library

8

Yo what’s good fam?

Back with another review, this one is a cool vocal instrument/library from Realitone.

It’s called Realivox Blue

Let’s just dive right in shall we?

So what is Realivox Blue?

realivox_blueIt’s a vocal library focused on it’s own word builder which allows you to create and play convincing words and phrases.

It’s got 3 different types of legato as well as the ability to stack voices for an ensemble type of sound.

You get control over vibrato as well, and you can even store your phrases or words as keyswitches for quickly recalling in a performance setting.

The word builder is very intuitive and easy to understand even without cracking open the manual, and there’s plenty of consonants, vowels, and special phrases to allow your creativity and imagination to run wild.

Quick Specs

  • content: 1.82GB
  • format: Kontakt 5 or Kontakt Player 5
  • price: $149 (on sale through January for 129.95 and 139.95)
  • product page: http://realitone.com/blue

How does it sound?

Reel to Reel Tape RecorderThe vocal itself has a nice sound, and it’s easy enough to do the basic vocal vowel sounds like oh, ah, eh, etc. You can quickly get a nice choir sound by stacking voices using those basic vowels.

The real coolness factor comes in when you start building phrases, and they actually sound good.

I love the way you can change the legato types between playing the words in the phrase to playing the vowels, this allows you to riff a little bit and hold out vowel sounds for extra expression.

You can also adjust how the vibrato works, as well as reverb and even get into the details like tuning, delay, and panning for the different voices.

There’s even some extra bright/dark settings for the voices that change the tone slightly by pitch shifting up/down in a way that adds a different feel to the vocal.

Overall I dig the sound, and the flexibility sort of adds to the sound with how you can build your words or phrases and tweak the tone as needed.

So what’s the bottom line?

Is this a niche product? Sure it is!

Is it a cool product? Sure it is!

If you’re looking for a vocal library that’s a bit different from all the epic choir libraries out there, you may definitely want to check this out.

4subsI give Realivox Blue 4 out of 5 subs, it sounds good and the interface is very intuitive while remaining flexible enough to allow you to dial in the vocal sound you’re looking for.

The more time you spend with it the more powerful it becomes as you start to understand how the consonants and vowels work together, even learning how to build phrase for the most realistic singing performance.

One thing that would be cool is if it came with some common…or not so common, preset phrases as well.

It’s definitely a cool product, go on over to the site to learn more about it and how to use it: http://realitone.com/blue

Leave a comment below and let me know what you think

Review: Realitone Realivox Blue Solo Female Vocal Library
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8 Comments

  1. It actually sounds pretty good. Quite comparable to Vocaloid. Everyone has their tastes. So far I’ve gone with Avanna by Zero-G and Big Al by PowerFX.

    Reply
  2. Realivox and many of the other voice examples is truly the best example of listening to a robot. Indeed most people have a sense of eerie dismay when listening to the likes of Altirus,realivox,cantus,lacrimosis, elves voices and so forth. Even though you hear the voice and try to program them all to be as life like as possible in the end they are all talking robots. Right now is at the very beginning of this process as in twenty to fifty years most human jobs will be replaced by robots and the humans left with work will become the technicians of these robots. At that time some of the world will live in luxury although because of greed most of the world will starve and be without food.because of profit made by the masters of the robots.

    In the neggining there was God, then there was man then in the end there were machines.

    Reply
    • Libraries like these are definitely not meant to replace the real voice completely, but to be used as a tool to allow more creativity for composers and producers.

      Reply

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