Product Demo: Auddict Octahorn Solo French Horn Library for Kontakt

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octohorn_coverHey what’s good fam!

Got to checkout the first product from a new company called Auddict, and the product is Octohorn which is the first instrument in their new brass lineup for Kontakt.

This does require the full version of Kontakt so keep that in mind.

From what I can tell, the focus is on making it sound great while keeping the interface simple to use…my type of instrument if I must say so!

Thanks to Auddict for sending this one over for me to demo, make sure you checkout their site and keep it locked for more instruments from them in the future.

Quick Specs

  • content: 7GB
  • format: Kontakt 4 or higher
  • price: Current £45.00 (about $65 usd), regular price £90.00 (about $130 usd)
  • product page: http://auddict.com/octohorn.html

Let me know what you think!

4 Comments

  1. Outside of the electronic music industry are real musicians whom have been making music for centuries with just their single instruments and pen and paper. Such as composers of the past whom relied only on their imagination to write down music scores. Is there anyone here that feels the same way. Do you feel overly burdened with too much technology. Does it depress you constantly looking at sample libraries and not sitting down and writing music with other humans. Have you ever noticed when writing music with computers that the music it self is missing something. All the sample libraries have copied humans and have returned a robotic lifeless sound which you here through your computer. After performing real music in various ensembles, orchestras, big bands, jazz bands and a few rock bands over forty five years I have learned something few electronic musicians know. When a human perform live in the real world and makes sounds such as through their voice, piano, wind instrument or percussion instrument they include in the sound a sense of their human soul. It is a sort of Sound DNA that gets lost in sample and recording technology. In essence it is difficult to describe unless you were there in the real world to perceive the performance. Ray Kurzweil has touched on this subject in the Rise of the Machines. It is my hope you are able to not only perceive this difference but also actively try your best to perform in the real world and add the human experience to your performances.

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  2. While I hear what you’re saying and there is some truth to technology taking away from the organic elements of musicmaking to some degree ultimately it’s not necessarily the technology that is at fault. Technology is just another instrument, it’s up to the user to demonstrate the organic feel by way of innovating off of technology as an instrument. Music itself is going through a transition overall which to me has more to do with the new generation of artists and not the technology.

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